Are Hector the Connector Predictions Right 99.9% of The Time? You Bet!

Courtesy of  www.flickr.com
By Hector E. Cisneros

Every year I write a predictions article based on what I see coming to the web in the not so distant future. These predictions cover the gamut from conventional advertising, to digital marketing, from new tech toys for our homes and personal use, to innovative game changing technologies that will alter the world as we know it. Some of my predictions are based on research, visible trends and the emergence of breakthrough technologies. Others are based on what I see as missing in a world full of me too products, poor customer service and blatant false advertising. In this episode of Working the Web to Win, I am going to go out on a limb (again) and see if I can keep my 98.5% prediction batting average streak going for another year. So read on and discover what my crystal ball has in store for 2016 and beyond.

Do Smartphones Dream About Facebook?

Courtesy of pixabay.com
By Carl Weiss

You may not have noticed, but artificial intelligence, otherwise known as AI, has been sending its all-knowing tendrils slowly but surely onto the World Wide Web.  Many of the largest tech companies are arduously working to be the first to perfect this technology so they can corner the market. The big players include Google, Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, IBM, and Amazon. Google has been in the headlines a lot recently. At first, its foray online was tenuous at best and comical at worst when Google created an AI that it turned loose to try to make sense of the images it encountered.  Hoping to find a workaround for one of the search engine’s biggest lapses, which makes search engine spiders blind to images and videos, the attempt resulted in hilarity when Google’s creation began to morph images as it tried to make sense of queries posed about them. 

Marketing 101 – What you need to Know before Buying Advertising

By Hector Cisneros
Courtesy of  www.flickr.com


You’re a new business owner, ready to buy your first advertisement, so you call the local newspapers, radio and TV stations along with several coupon and website vendors to see what they have to offer. Unfortunately, you have never purchased advertising before and you’re hoping the advertisers will help you figure out exactly what to do. You may not realize that most advertising sales reps are paid mainly on commission and their primary mission is to sell you advertising or they don’t make any money. What happens next is all too often the scenario that plays out. In this article we will follow this scenario and cover a simple 10 step program that will insure you’re buying the right advertising and that your return on investment has the best chance of making a profit. Now let’s get back to that scenario.

The Grinch Goes Digital

(We'll cover 12 ways online scammers can steal from you this Christmas.)


By Carl Weiss
Courtesy of  commons.wikimedia.org

TIS the season… to be scammed by online scammers who are out to steal your holiday cheer.  Every year as online commerce grows, so do online scams.  Today’s cybercriminals are going to try to entice you into giving them your hard earned cash through a number of ever more imaginative scams.  In today’s blog, I will endeavor to give you a leg up on the top 12 ways to avoid getting Grinched this holiday season.

Has the Internet Made Us Smarter?

Courtesy of  pixabay.com
By Carl Weiss

For all intents and purposes the Internet has been in existence for 20 years. During that time, the entire world has literally been at our fingertips online.  But has the advent of the World Wide Web made people smarter, or has it truly made us dumber as we become more reliant on having access to all kinds of information at the click of a mouse?  In today’s blog, I will look at how the Internet has affected us as a species, as well as examining whether it appears to be helping or hurting our intellectual evolution.  I will also delve into the rise of web-enabled “smart devices” that will soon be taking control of everything from our appliances to driving our cars. 

Caution: Slippery Road Ahead

As I entered the office building where I work, I spied a young woman who works in the office across the hall coming down the stairs.  Wearing high heels with her head canted forward, she was looking at her smartphone and texting as she descended the staircase. 

“You’d better be careful before you wind up taking a tumble,” I told her as she made her way through the lobby.

“Not to worry,” she responded without looking up from her phone.  “I do this all the time.”

Coutesy of  commons.wikimedia.org
“I know,” I shot back.  “That’s what I’m worried about.” As she headed toward the exit, I looked back to see if she ran into the door, as well as wondering whether I was the only one who seemed to realize that the world is becoming an increasingly impersonal place?

Maybe it’s a generational issue, but I remember a time when people weren’t so absorbed in technology that it became a hazard to their health.  I also remember when people took the time to meet and talk without having to bring their technological ball and chain with them. 

Think about it, the same technology that puts the world at our fingertips has actually caused our species to become more and more isolated.  Between texting, social networking, chat rooms, home delivery apps and virtual worlds such as Second Life, it is now possible to avoid interpersonal contact altogether.  (Any parent of a teenager will agree with this conundrum.)  What’s even worse is that technology has insinuated itself into practically every corner of modern society.  If you don’t believe me, go to a restaurant or coffee shop and see how many people are either texting or surfing the web while they eat, even if they have a dining companion sitting across from them.  Most people refer to this as multitasking.  I call it rude.

Besides, research has proven that multitasking isn’t helping us as a species.  It’s hurting us.  Everyone from Stanford Professor Dr. Clifford Nass to Michael Gazziniga, Director of the Sage Center for the Study of the Mind, agrees that multitasking negatively affects everything from attention span and writing quality, to task completion and brain function.

Stanford researchers compared groups of people based on their tendency to multitask and their belief that it helps their performance. They found that heavy multitaskers—those who multitask a lot and feel that it boosts their performance—were actually worse at multitasking than those who like to do a single thing at a time. The frequent multitaskers performed worse because they had more trouble organizing their thoughts and filtering out irrelevant information, and they were slower at switching from one task to another. Ouch.”

Courtesy of  acreelman.blogspot.com
What’s even more alarming is that the study found evidence that persistently heavy multitasking was shown to actually lower IQ scores by up to 15 points. 

(Score Internet 1, Evolution 0)

Far from pushing a “down with technology” agenda, when the Stanford research was performed, it was assumed that there must be some advantage to multitasking.  So they set out to find it. 

"We kept looking for what they're better at, and we didn't find it," said Ophir, the study's lead author and a researcher in Stanford's Communication Between Humans and Interactive Media Lab.

In the tests, the researchers created two groups of students, those who heavily engaged in media multitasking and those who didn’t.  Each group was then given a series of exercises to test everything from pattern recognition and organizational skills to their ability to filter out irrelevant information.  To their surprise, the research indicated that the more heavily students engaged in multitasking, the worse they did at these tasks.  Puzzled at why the multitaskers did so poorly, the researchers thought that maybe they excelled at switching from one task to another.  So they tested this hypothesis only to conclude that once again, the light multitaskers outperformed the heavy multitaskers.

"They couldn't help thinking about the task they weren't doing," Ophir said. "The high multitaskers are always drawing from all the information in front of them. They can't keep things separate in their minds."

So profound were the discoveries made in this study that it led the researchers to wonder if it was the Internet that had somehow interfered with the cognitive function of the brains of students who were heavily into multitasking, or if they were in fact born with an inability to concentrate.  Either way, the heavy multitaskers, by exhibiting an inability to filter out irrelevant information were clearly at a disadvantage.  Even more alarming, some of the heavy multitaskers also exhibited the same physiological symptoms as drug addicts.  In other words, the more they multitasked, the more electronic stimuli they craved.

Can You Say Crackberry?

Courtesy of  www.flickr.com
Digital addiction is nothing new.  Ever since video games were introduced back in the 1970’s a percentage of the population has espoused a propensity to playing until they dropped.  Back then to feed this Jones meant lining up with quarters at the local arcade or locking yourself in your bedroom to play game consoles until your parents dragged you downstairs for dinner.  But with the advent of the smartphone, the ability to feed your need at any time and place means that a much higher percentage of the population is psychologically addicted to tech in one form or another.  This is creating a problem for many.

Benjamin Wong, a counsellor at Richmond Addiction Services, said he works with individuals between the ages of 12 to 25 and their families to support them in dealing with digital addictions — when they just can't separate themselves from a screen, be it a smartphone, computer or gaming device.”

Just like drug addicts, the effort to break a digital addiction takes a lot of time (as much as a year).  It also isn’t relegated merely to Millennials.  Even Baby Boomers can get hooked on tech.  And the tawdry road that leads to digital addiction is a more slippery slope than that experienced by devotees of illicit pharmaceuticals.  As opposed to back alley deals, digital addiction can be as simple as accessing your favorite social media site.

In a 2014 CBS News report entitled, How Real a Risk is Social Media Digital Addiction,” social media marketer Jason Thibeault reported that he quit Facebook cold turkey when he realized that it was becoming an addiction.

"Just imagine that Facebook is like a digital water cooler. I was drinking A TON of water every hour," he wrote. "Although I'm not a neuroscientist, I'd venture to say that what was happening was related to my Dopamine levels--when I was checking status updates on Facebook, my brain was rewarding itself with Dopamine; when I wasn't, and Dopamine levels dropped as a result, I started 'jonesing for a fix.'"

Courtesy of  en.wikipedia.org
Jonesing for a Facebook Fix?  You heard that right.  You and the 700,000 other people that read Jason’s essay.  Is it any wonder that professionals, including the National Institutes of Health are becoming increasingly concerned over the deleterious effects of digital addiction.  While Information Addiction Disorder (IAD) is still not listed as an official psychiatric disorder, its counterpart, Internet Gaming Addiction was added in 2013, (better late than never).

(Score: Internet 2 Evolution: 0)

As our wired world continues its march toward technological domination, far from being an isolated incident, IAD will continue to spread as the Internet becomes available to more and more of the world’s population. (Google is building blimps that are intended to bring the Internet to isolated parts of the world.) To make matters worse, a new age of internet-enabled appliances, clothing and devices such as cars are going to inevitably make inroads into a number of areas that were once thought exclusively the domain of human beings. 

While I could wax apocalyptic about how smart houses, clothes, cars and appliances are going to lead to the disintegration of what’s left of society, I think I’ll let IDG Enterprise CEO Mike Friedenberg chime in with his post on cio.com:

“I look back at the time my parents taught me how to parallel park, and it's a very fond memory. Now all you need to do is push a button and your car will parallel park itself. Makes me wonder what our lives will become. Is the future really about pushing a lot of buttons to get things done?
Courtesy of  en.wikipedia.org
Attending the Consumer Electronics Show this year, you would have thought it was the Year of Smart: smart homes, smart cars, smart fridges, smart forks and spoons, smart watches, smart TVs, and even smart toilets. All of these devices have the ultimate goal of tracking, storing, analyzing, optimizing and educating us humans on how we can be better, healthier, fitter or smarter. It was all a bit overwhelming. If only everything that happens in Vegas really did stay there. ”
(Score: Internet 3 Evolution: 0)

My partner Hector told me about the new Terminator movie where it depicted a possible scenario of our not too distant future. In this future, everyone was wanting and waiting for a single operating system called Genesis. This new OS would run every machine and appliance that we use. The reason people wanted this change was so that it would make it easier for us to learn and use these devices. However the new OS in the movie was actually the artificial intelligence called Sky Net - poised to take over the world and kill off most of the human race. This is not too different from the doomsday proclamations as those issued by the likes of Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking concerning the emergence of artificial intelligence. 



There is no doubt that the Internet has allow us access to vast amounts of information and given us a huge knowledge base to draw from. With this the huge amount of knowledge also come a vast amount of responsibility. As to whether the Internet is going to wind up making us smarter or dumber, all I can say is this - that if society takes just a few more steps toward technology, it’s probably going to be game, set, match as far as human evolution is concerned.


----

In this article I have discussed how the improper use of the internet has created a large segment of tech addicted humans worldwide. I provide real studies that show how multitasking people preform much worse than those who don’t multitask and how people actually show withdrawal symptoms when access to their social networks are not available.

Get your FREE e-Book!
If you found this article useful please share it with your friends, family and co-workers. If you would like to learn more about this subject, visit the notes page on this blog for the BlogTalkRadio show dated 11/17/15. I recommend checking out "Are You Prepared for Technological Extinction?“, “The Basics of Biohacking”, Is Too Much Technology Bad for Business?Is The Internet of Everything Really, Everything They're Cracking it Up to Be? and “How to Safely Whet Your Appetite for Smartphone Apps” You can also search for other related articles by typing in “casinos” in the search box top of this blog.

If you feel your business could use some help with its marketing, contact us at 904-410-2091,We will provide a free marketing analysis to help you get better results. If you'd like a free copy of our eBook, "Internet Marketing Tips for the 21st Century," please fill in the form below and we will give you immediate access to it. Your information is always kept private and is never sold. Don't forget to Plus us on Google+.



Carl Weiss is president of WorkingtheWebtoWin.com a digital marketing agency in Jacksonville, Florida that routinely works with bloggers and other online marketers to grow their businesses. 

Social Networking Secrets & Best Practices: Part 3 – There is no Substitute

By Hector Cisneros

I have been actively networking in a number of organizations since the early 1980’s. My experience, tells me that most people get out of social networking what they put into it. People often come up to me after a speaking engagement and ask, what is the magic formula for networking success. How can they become successful as a social Networker? My answer is always the same, it’s not a magic formula, although many perceive it to be a secret, a powerful principle or other hidden system of techniques. My answer always state that the secret is in plain sight. Look at the word “network” and the answer is in the title itself. The first parts of this series addressed the relationship between face to face networking and social media. Part two addresses the secret aspects of Giving. In part three of this series, we will discuss the habits that must be acquired and followed, in order to become a consummate Networker. We’ll be looking at 15 important habits which will guide and drive your success. So let’s get to work and begin by dissecting the term Social Networker.

Social Networking Secrets & Best Practices: Part 2 - Giving is The Givers Secrets

Courtesy of WorkingtheWebtoWin.com
By Hector Cisneros

Have you ever wondered why some networkers are phenomenally successful and other struggle to even get one referral? Why is it that many are attracted to a few seemingly special networkers and others are shunned? Could it be that there is a secret that these few Super Networkers know, that others do not? Part one of this series shows the relationship between face to face and online social networking.  In this second part of Best Practices of Social Networking Secrets series, I will cover what those Super Networkers know - the secrets that makes Super Networkers magnetic. The secret that brings them followers and referrals far beyond the average business Networker. The magical secret of Giving! Giving you say? It can’t be that simple. Well, I didn’t say it was simple or even easy, but yes, giving is the magical secret. In Part three of this series we will explore another secret that demonstrates that there is no substitute for proactive participation. But in this article we will expose Giving in all its glory. We will explore what has taken me a lifetime of learning. Now let’s explore what I mean by giving, so that you can use it to produce massive positive result for you and your business.

What’s at Stake When It’s Fake?

Courtesy of  en.wikipedia.org
By Carl Weiss
  
Forgery has been around for as long as civilization has flourished.  No sooner did humans start using chits burnished onto clay tablets to trade goods, when you can be sure some enterprising lad started turning out fakes.  Through the ages people have forged everything from works of art to currency and stock certificates. Some of the forgers went on to become legends.  Many of them went on to prison.  However, what most people do not realize is the effect that forgery has had or could have had on history. Fast forward to the 21st Century! Today a whole new world of forgery is taking place, not by a few, but by billions of unsuspecting internet users. We have fake business websites, fake government websites, Fake blog articles, fake reviews, fake email solicitations, fake products site, fake social media site, heck, what isn’t being faked on the web. To start with, let’s look at fakery throughout the ages to give you a little perspective.

Social Networking Secrets & Best Practices – Part 1 - Two Sides of the Same Coin

Courtesy of  www.flickr.com
By Hector Cisneros

Have you ever wondered what the relationship is between face to face networking (aka word of mouth marketing) and social media marketing? Have you noticed all the similarities between these seemingly very different marketing venues? I mean, come on, with word of mouth you’re having a one to one meeting at a coffee shop and with social networking you’re posting current events in your industry, right? How could these two very different venues have any similarities at all? Well, in this series I will cover over three dozen similarities that these marketing systems have in common. It is my hope that once you understand the commonality of these venues, you will start to use them synergistically to gain more followers, prospects and long term loyal customers. In part one of this series, I will cover how these two systems are two sides of the same coin. In part two I will cover how both use the “Secret of Giving” and in part three I will explain how both require proactive engagement for your ultimate success.  

Is Online Gambling a Bad Bet?

Courtesy of en.wikipedia.org
By Carl Weiss

Since its inception, the US government has tried to put a stop to online gambling. Yet it has failed to slow, much less stop its spread. With the emergence of paid fantasy football sites, which advertise their games on TV, not to mention New Jersey offering legalized online casino games, is it any wonder that this industry is anything but a bad bet to developers and operators alike? Still, the feds persist in doing everything in their power to put the brakes on one of the most lucrative online industries ever created. In today’s blog we will look at the evolution of the online gambling industry.

Courtesy of  en.wikipedia.org
The birth of the Internet and online gambling occurred at nearly the same time.  In 1994, the Caribbean nation of Antigua passed what was called the Free Trade & Processing Act, which provided licenses for online casino operators.   While providing a safe haven for online casinos, the industry did not exactly start with a bang.  In fact, by 1996 there were only 15 sites offering online casino games.  But as other countries began to bet big by legalizing, regulating and taxing Internet casinos, the tide was bound to turn.  As a result, by the end of 1998 there were more than 200 online casinos generating some $830 million in revenue. 

Curiously, none of these were based in the United States.  That’s due to the fact that while other countries were busy legislating online casinos, the US was doing everything it could to stamp them out.  Granted, in the US in the 1990’s there were land-based casinos in two dozen States, plus an assortment of gambling cruises plying the high seas, not to mention horse racing, dog racing and lotteries galore.  Still, the feds decided that the best way to deal with online casinos was simply to make them illegal. 
Courtesy of  www.flickr.com

That’s not to say that everyone from US based search engines to advertising agencies, magazines, newspapers and online payment portals like PayPal weren’t able to cash in on the online gambling craze.  It also didn’t mean that US citizens weren’t able to play for cash at online casinos.  They could and did in droves.  By 1999, online gambling was so prevalent that it caused the feds to put the first shot across the bows of the online gambling industry when the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act (IGPA) was floated in Congress.  While the bill worked its way through Capitol Hill, it puts casino operators on notice.

A Washington political insider also took notice.  Lobbyist Jack Abramoff was being paid $100,000 per month by a company called eLottery that wanted to sell state lottery tickets online.  The company was founded in 1993, betting that it would be able to create an online business that could be worth billions.  The problem was that no sooner had eLottery inked its first deal with an Idaho Indian tribe to begin selling lottery tickets, when the Justice Department invoked existing gambling laws to shut them down.

To make matters worse, by late 1999, the Senate had passed the IGPA and it was up for a House vote to become law.  If that happened, eLottery would be history.  Arrayed against the online gambling industry was virtually everyone on the religious right, from the Moral Majority to the Christian Coalition.  If Abramoff was going to save the day he was going to have to pull the legislative rabbit out of his hat.  Searching for some leverage in the language of the bill that would allow him to turn the tide, he seized on exceptions in the bill for jai alai and horse racing.  What happened next was Machiavellian politics at its best.

Courtesy of  commons.wikimedia.org
To quote the Washington Post, “To reach the House conservatives, Abramoff turned to Sheldon, leader of the Orange County, Calif. - based Traditional Values Coalition, a politically potent group that publicly opposed gambling and said it represented 43,000 churches. Abramoff asked eLottery to write a check in June 2000 to Sheldon's Traditional Values Coalition (TVC).  He also routed eLottery money to Ralph Reed, former head of the Christian Coalition, along with a number of other organizations, including Americans for Tax Reform; Traditional Values Coalition, and a Seattle Orthodox Jewish foundation, Toward Tradition.

Abramoff had previously paid Reed's consulting firms to whip up Christian opposition to Indian casinos and a proposed Alabama state lottery that would compete with the gambling business of Abramoff's tribal clients.  Abramoff's plan: argues that the legislation and its exemptions would actually expand legalized gambling.

On July 17, 2000, the Internet Gambling Prohibition Act went down to defeat, to the astonishment of supporters who included many anti-gambling groups and Christian conservatives.”

Of course, when it came to eLottery, it was a case of winning the battle and losing the war, since it never sold another lottery ticket again.  As for the warriors, Abramoff and several other players would eventually be prosecuted for their activities, including Speaker of the House Tom Delay who was indicted on September 28, 2005.  After his indictment, DeLay stepped down from his position as Majority Leader. He was the first congressional leader ever to be indicted. 
Courtesy of  en.wikipedia.org

You Can’t Tell the Players without a Scorecard

But the game goes on as they say and by 2001 an estimated 8 million Americans were partaking in
online gambling.  Despite the mostly ruthless legislation the online gaming industry would continue to flourish.  As well as Antigua and a number of other Caribbean nations, other countries that legalized online gambling include Australia, France, and the UK.  In Germany, online gambling is illegal with the exception of Schleswig-Holstein, which is the only German state where operators can apply for an online gaming license.  In some provinces of Canada online gambling is illegal, while in others it is not. In India, where online operators are forbidden, the Central Board of Direct Taxes in 2015 directed online poker players in the country to declare their money on foreign gambling sites.

Courtesy of  en.wikipedia.org
The problem with having so many players in the game with different rules is that legal confusion was bound to occur.  In 2004, after being threatened by the Department of Justice, whose broad interpretation of the Federal Wire Act contradicted the US Court of Appeals, the world’s two most popular search engines opted to remove gambling advertising from their sites.  In July 2006, the CEO of BetonSports, a company that is publicly traded on the London Stock Exchange, was detained in Texas while changing planes in route from London to Costa Rica, having been previously charged in a sealed indictment with violations of US federal laws relating to illegal gambling. That same year, Sporting bet chairman Jay Cohen was detained in New York City on a Louisiana warrant while traveling in the US.  Even though the US Appeals court stated that the Wire Act doesn’t apply to non-sports betting, the US Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal of Jay Cohen’s conviction since his company offered sports bets to US citizens.

Later that same year, both the House and Senate upped the ante by passing the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006, which made it illegal for banks or other financial institutions to make transactions with online gambling sites.  In response to the enactment of the UIGEA, a number of online gambling operators opted to suspend real-money gambling with US citizens.  Others, including such sites as PokerStars, Full Tilt Poker, and Bodog vowed to continue serving customers in the US.

Courtesy of  en.wikipedia.org
In June 2009, the Department of Justice seized more than $34 million belonging to over 27,000 online poker players. This represented the first time that the DoJ had specifically targeted players as opposed to online gambling operators.  Less than a year later, on November 22, 2010, the New Jersey State Senate became the first state to legalize online gambling.  While the legally licensed operators are allowed to provide the public with online poker, casino games and slots, they were prohibited from accepting online sports bets.  They were also restricted to dealing with players who resided in New Jersey.  Are you confused yet?

If it Looks Like a Duck

Apparently at least three online poker operators were confused.  Especially when they were indicted in 2011 for accepting wagers from US citizens.  Furthermore, the indictment alleges the companies that were indicted sought to evade US law by disguising online gambling payments as purchases of merchandise. On July 31, 2012, two of the three companies indicted settled with the US Attorney for $731 million without any admission of guilt.
Logo of the Fantasy Sports Association.
Logo of the Fantasy Sports Association. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

That being said, as of the writing of this blog, there is one chink in the government’s armor that several wily operators are currently exploiting.  I’m talking about fantasy sports where a number of popular operators are cleaning up at present.  To quote a Frontline blog,

“At the time, fantasy sports were a low-key competition in which bettors assembled their own teams, then watched how their players performed over an entire season. The legal exemption for fantasy sports was based on its definition not as gambling but as a game of skill. Today, fantasy sites offer daily contests, million-dollar prizes and bets on individual sports such as golf, mixed martial arts and Nascar races, magnifying the element of chance and making the exemption tougher to defend… The businesses of fantasy sports and online gambling are increasingly intertwined. Operators of online gambling sites have begun investing in fantasy sports, and some of DraftKings’ senior managers came from online gambling companies or were professional poker players. Some of fantasy sports’ most successful players are former poker players, too.”
Courtesy of en.wikipedia.org

Not only have fantasy sports operators like FanDuel and DraftKings become wildly popular and profitable online, you can see their TV spots airing during many popular sporting events, including NFL Football. It’s a wonder that the DoJ hasn’t gotten interested in an online game that according to the Frontline report grossed $43.6 million in entry fees from 7.1 million US players in a single weekend. 

While fantasy football leagues have to date remained off the government’s anti-gambling radar, the recent revelation that a few fantasy sports insiders had used inside information not available to the public to win big cash payouts has drawn the attention of the NY attorney general along with the FBI.  Whether this multibillion dollar industry will stand the test of time is anybody’s guess.  But I for one wouldn’t bet the farm.

In this article I have discussed how online gambling is trying to make its way back into the US internet arena. In particular I cover the ebbs and flow that has brought us to new online gambling in New Jersey and the latest online market – fantasy sports, like FanDuel and DraftKing. This latest foray will test the government’s resolve for squelching online gambling.

If you found this article useful please share it with your friends, family and co-workers. If you would like to learn more about this subject, visit the notes page on this blog for the BlogTalkRadio show dated 10/20/15. I recommend checking out "Who’s Watching Who In the Surveillance Society?“  You can also search for other related articles by typing in “casinos” in the search box top of this blog.

If you feel your business could use some help with its marketing, contact us at 904-410-2091. We will provide a free marketing analysis to help you get better results. If you'd like a free copy of our eBook, "Internet Marketing Tips for the 21st Century," please fill in the form below and we will give you immediate access to it. Your information is always kept private and is never sold. Don't forget to Plus us on Google+.


Carl Weiss is president of WorkingtheWebtoWin.com a digital marketing agency in Jacksonville, Florida that routinely works with bloggers and other online marketers to grow their businesses. 

Related articles